Migrate from OpenElec to OSMC

I recently upgraded my ambilight clone from 50 to 104 LEDs and I’ve also updated my OpenElec installation on my Raspberry Pi B+ to 6.0.0. However, the hyperiond wasn’t able to communicate properly with Kodi so that no ambilight information was send to the LEDs: The LEDs would always be black, if I want to watch something on the Raspberry Pi.

I’ve opened an issue on github but I didn’t get  a useable response so far. The configuration and installation worked fine when I’ve connected with the iOS app or from the command line.

Today I’ve tried to use OSMC as surrogate for OpenElec and I’m really impressed: it worked almost out of the box with my old configuration. So I want to share what’s necessary to migrate from OpenElec to OSMC:

  1. Create a backup from your OpenElec .kodi folder. You’ll find this folder on OpenElec in /storage/.kodi
  2. Backup your hyperion.config.json or create a new one with HyperCon according to your setup
  3. Install OSMC on a SD card
  4. Boot from this SD card and follow the initial configuration screen
  5. Connect via SSH to OSMC. default user/password are osmc/osmc.
  6. Install hyperion according to nadnerb’s instructions. The spi part is important, since OSMC has SPI disabled by default. You’ll also want to remove the lirc line since this blocks the pins necessary for the default installation of WS2801 LEDs.
  7. Copy your hyperion.config.json to /etc. Be sure that you’ve changed the path to your effects folder from /storage/hyperion/effects to /usr/hyperion/effects
  8. Copy your .kodi folder to OSMC’s /home/osmc folder and overwrite any file
  9. Reboot and enjoy your known settings 🙂

Update OpenElec 4.2.1 to 5.0.0 on a Raspberry Pi

XBMC is no more, it was replaced by KODI. The OpenElec team updated its media center distribution to version 5.0.0 which includes KODI. So it was time to update my RaspberryPi and its really easy:

  1. Backup your current installation with the OpenElec Backup tool.
  2. Move your backup to a secure location. You can access the backup tar file via SMB from the backup share.
  3. Download the 5.0.0 release image for Raspberry Pi.
  4. Place the tar file in the update share of your OpenElec installation.
  5. Reboot your Raspberry Pi.
  6. It should be rebooting a few times.

After these steps you should be greeted with the new KODI logo.


Kodi start screen

And you’re done, its really easy as a Pi 😉

Use OpenElec on Raspberry Pi with Hyperion

I recently updated my Raspberry Pi in the living room. I used Rasbmc as an easy to use XBMC distribution. However, there will be no update for Rasbmc once XBMC is replaced by KODI. You are then forced to use OSMC. As I also use Hyperion as server for my WS2801 LED stripes behind the TV I’m not sure if Hyperion will work with OSMC. Therefore, it was time to look for an alternative.

This is where OpenElec comes into play. Its a Linux distribution optimised for use with XBMC and is not that easily customizable if you want your Rasbperry to serve other purposes as well. But that’s not my concern, as I just intend to use it as XBMC client.

There is already a nice tutorial available on the OpenElec Github page. However, I had some serious issues with Hyperion and I want it to document, should I ever reinstall again.

Hyperion tries to connect to the XBMC JSON RPC api to get information about the current status of XBMC. This includes the information for active screensavers or just idling in the main menu. If I just use the instructions from the Github page, I was not able to deactivate my background lights while I was in the XBMC main menu. I’ve found two issues in the Github Project but only one was really helpful:

You have to activate and deactivate the Remote and local control of XBMC, only then is Hyperion able to connect to XBMC and only then it will get the right status information. Now it finally obeys the configuration and disable the background lights when its in the main menu.

 

PS: Don’t let yourself be fooled by the colors from the attached picture. The white balance picked it wrong up and it was also to a time where I did not calibrated colors for Hyperion 🙂 It looks much better in reality 😉

Rasbmc – falsche Zeitzoneneinstellung

Seit einiger Zeit besitze ich ein Raspberry Pi. Dieser kleine Computer ist sehr günstig (etwa 30 Euro) und kann als XBMC eingerichtet werden. Dabei habe ich mich für die Rasbmc Distribution entschieden, da diese sehr einfach (ein Befehl auf der Konsole) installiert werden kann.

 

Bereits bei der Ersteinrichtung wird man nach der aktuellen Zeitzone gefragt. Hier habe ich natürlich für Deutschland Berlin als Stadt und Europa als Region ausgewählt. Leider zeigt mir mein XBMC aber die Uhrzeit immer um zwei Stunden nach hinten versetzt an. Wenn also jetzt 21:47 ist, dann zeigte XBMC 19:47 an.

 

Eine kurze Google Recherche ergab dann, dass man den Assistenten zur Einrichtung der Zeitzone erneut aufrufen kann. Dazu tippt man

sudo dpkg-reconfigure tzdata

ein. Der Assistent führt einen dann durch die Konfiguration und sieht dann in etwa so aus:

Rasbmc - Geographic Area Raspbmc - Region

Doch das reichte noch nicht aus, um auch wirklich die richtige Uhrzeit anzuzeigen. Man muss in den Darstellungsoptionen des XBMC ebenfalls die Region und den Ort auswählen. Ich hatte eigentlich erwartet, das diese Einstellung übernommen wird, aber dem ist leider nicht so. Die richtigen Einstellungen für Deutschland sieht man auf dem Screenshot:

Raspbmc - Time Settings