Windows 8.1 and Intel USB 3.0 eXtensible Host Controller code 10

Sometimes my desktop computer does not recognize its attached devices on its USB 3.0 ports. This is especially annoying when you use these ports for your input devices and you are not able to login to your computer.

I’ve ran a few times into this problem, but never found a real working solution to fix this problem. You can still use the USB 2.0 ports for the input devices, so you are able to login again. When you look at your device manager, you will see an yellow exclamation mark on the

Intel USB 3.0 eXtensible Host Controller

and if you look at its device details you will see an error code 10. A research on the internet showed me that other people are also affected by this, especially in combination with Windows 8.1 (while Windows 7 and Linux pose no problem).

First of all, there was this official Microsoft page for troubleshooting and installation of USB 3.0 devices. IT gave me no new clues and was therefore useless. Then I was full of joy when I found this page in the MSDN blogs from one of the engineers at Microsoft responsible for the USB 3.0 stack in Windows 8. However, while providing much technical background and tips for debugging, it did not help me with my particular code 10 error. If you search the page for „code 10“ you will also find two people desperately looking for a solution, so I’m not alone with this problem. Another excellent technical resource was this page. While providing also a few ideas for what to look for, his ultimate idea was to install the Windows 8.1 update (which I already installed).

So nothing really helped me here. My earlier tries blamed the problem on the integrated USB 3.0 hub of my Dell U2713HM monitor, but it would not help to disconnect the hub and power for a clean reboot. I then thought I could find a better driver on the Asrock page for my Z77E-ITX board but that did not help either.

Only working solution I came up with was to uninstall the controller and to reboot the computer. After this reboot, the controller was reinstalled and worked again. I honestly don’t know what went wrong here, but it is a real annoying thing and I hope that coming Windows updates will fix this.

How to configure Apple Airport Express 1st Generation on Mavericks

This is a follow up on my older blog post „How to configure Apple Airport Express 1st Generation on Mountain Lion„. The situation is the same: I’ve wanted to configure my fathers Airport Express 1st Generation. However, we both updated to Mac OS X Mavericks 10.9 and where unable to use the Airport configuration utility I’ve created in my aforementioned blog post.

Looking online for a solution to this problem, I’ve found this blog post which provides you with a running Configuration Utility. Corey did also an analysis why the older Utility was not running anymore: The Utility relies on a library which broke backward compatibility in Mavericks.

Synology DiskStation Download Station access to temporary BitTorrent files

My Synology DS-213+ can be used as a BitTorrent client. The necessary package „Download Station“ is available for free in the standard repositories of the DiskStation. If you use the Download Station for BitTorrent downloads, you may want to access files from the torrent early and before the complete torrent is finished.

In this case you could assume that the setup download folder would be also used as a place for these temporary files. But the Download Station uses a hidden folder for these files. It’s only visible if you login to your DiskStation using SSH or Telnet. It’s the folder „/volume1/@download“.

If you want to continue to download and want to check the folders content at the same time, you will need to mount this folder to a shared folder which is accessable via SMB or AFP and their likes. The command

mount --bind /volume1/@download /volume1/your-shared-folder"

will mount this hidden folder into your-shared-folder. This way you can access all temporary files. But be aware, that this command will only last until you reboot your DiskStation. By the way: I’m not alone with this wish to access the temporary files. Some people in the official Synology forum also decided to ask for this feature.

How to enable separated Guest Networks with DD-WRT on TP-Link TL-WR1043N

I’ve recently setup a new and shiny TP-Link TL-WR1043N Gigabit Router with DD-WRT and wanted to document how I set it up as access point with opening an additional guest network.

First, you need to flash DD-WRT to the Router. As I was using a brand new device, I’ve chosen the „factory-to-ddwrt.bin“ from the DD-WRT Router Database. Just type in „TP-Link TL-WR1043N“ and you will see three image files. If you are uncertain, which firmware is the right to choose, try these instructions. If you already used DD-WRT, you should know how to make updates to your router. I will not cover this cases in my documentation.

After flashing, you need to configure it as Wireless Access Point.

When you are ready, open these instructions on how to create „Multiple WLANs“. The TP-Link is Atheros based hardware, which means that all wireless network interfaces will start with „ath“ in their names. Follow the guide, until you come to the part where it describes the „Command Method for DHCP“. Add to the configuration the IP of your local DNS server:


# Enables DHCP on br1
interface=br1
# Set the default gateway for br1 clients
dhcp-option=br1,3,192.168.2.1
# Set the DHCP range and default lease time of 24 hours for br1 clients
dhcp-range=br1,192.168.2.100,192.168.2.150,255.255.255.0,24h
dhcp-option=br1,6,[DNS IP 1],[DNS IP 2]

Continue with the instructions of the wiki page until you reach the chapter „Restricting Access“. This is the configuration which I used to separate the Guest network from your main network:


iptables -t nat -I POSTROUTING -o get_wanface -j SNAT --to nvram get wan_ipaddr
iptables -I FORWARD -i br1 -m state --state NEW -j ACCEPT
iptables -I FORWARD -p tcp --tcp-flags SYN,RST SYN -j TCPMSS --clamp-mss-to-pmtu
iptables -I FORWARD -i br0 -o br1 -m state --state NEW -j DROP
iptables -I FORWARD -i br1 -d nvram get lan_ipaddr/nvram get lan_netmask -m state --state NEW -j DROP
iptables -t nat -I POSTROUTING -o br0 -j SNAT --to nvram get lan_ipaddr
iptables -I INPUT -i br1 -p udp --dport 67 -j ACCEPT
iptables -I INPUT -i br1 -p udp --dport 53 -j ACCEPT
iptables -I INPUT -i br1 -p tcp --dport 53 -j ACCEPT

With this configuration I was able to create a separated Guest WLAN.

Dell U2713HM connection problems with Macbook Pro 5,5 over Mini DisplayPort

Yet another tip for the international reader 🙂

After some years with my old Samsung Syncmaster 205BW, I decided to invest into a new big screen with sufficient possibilities to connect all my computers while avoiding dual or triple monitor setups. After testing several 23 and 24 inch screens, I decided to buy a Dell U2713HM from an Amazon Warehouse deals promotion. This screen is really amazing and I cannot live without its WQHD/2560*1440 resolution 🙂

But to use this high resolution, you must connect it to your computer or mac via DualLink DVI or Mini DisplayPort. HDMI and VGA or even normal DVI are only usable up to FullHD/1920*1080. So I could easily use the supplied DualLink DVI Cable to connect my PC (with an Nvidia GTX 660 TI) and my old Macbook Pro 5,5 over its Mini DisplayPort.

While the PC connection is without problems, the DisplayPort tends to forget that there is an external screen attached. The screen will change between black and standard gray/blue from the Mac OS X 10.8. It is not possible to use the external screen until I disconnect and reconnect the Mini DisplayPort cable. Only then, my Mac realizes that there is an external screen and uses it in its native resolution.

This problem originates in the DDC/CI support of this monitor. With DDC/CI it is possible to control your screens settings from your PC/Mac without the use of the screens OSD. While this looks tempting, I would have never used this feature. That is why I decided to deactivate the support in the Dell OSD.

You can deactivate this option in the settings menu of the Dell screen under the point „Other settings“, then DDC/CI set to disable.

Suddenly, everything works again and my Mac detects the screen without any problems, even when it wakes up and DisplayPort wasn’t selected as source in the monitor.